What is CB language?

What is CB language?

CB slang is the distinctive anti-language, argot or cant which developed amongst users of citizens’ band radio (CB), especially truck drivers in the USA during the 1980s.

What are some CB codes?

CB Radio 10 Codes

10-1 Receiving poorly (I can’t hear you)
10-2 Receiving well (I can hear you)
10-3 Stop transmitting (aka shut up)
10-4 Affirmative/Message received
10-6 Busy/Hold on

What does 1010 mean on a CB radio?

10-10: Transmission completed, standing by. 10-11: Talking too rapidly. 10-12: Visitors present Shhhh! 10-13: Advise weather/road conditions.

What does what is your 1020 mean?

The phrase essentially means, “What is your location?” or “Identify your position,” but is a corrupted phrase from the original “10-20” used by law enforcement to verbally encode their radio transmissions so that non-police listeners would not easily discover police operations, as well as to communicate quicker and …

What is a 10-200 in Trucker talk?

10-200: Police needed at… (Somebody is breaking the law).

What is the CB language?

This language is not known by many people, but it was developed when people (and not just radio amateurs) used CB radio to communicate. We are now active users of mobile phones, messengers, e-mail, etc.. CB radio is only used by those who are interested in it.

What do the CB radio talk numbers mean?

For example, in the world of CB radio talk number codes mean things. Here is a list of CB 10 codes, often followed by what they mean (and what they truly mean). 10-1: Receiving poorly (I can’t hear you). 10-2: Receiving well (I can hear you). 10-3: Stop transmitting (Shut up). 10-4: Affirmative/I agree. 10-5: Relay message (Pass it on).

Why learn CB Lingo and radio code?

Learning CB lingo and radio code is a critical first step to effective communication. The most important rule of conduct when using a CB radio is don’t take up more airtime than you have to on a crowded channel.

Do you know CB linguistics and trucker talk?

But knowing the CB lingo is part of being a trucker. It’s trucker culture. You gotta walk the walk and talk the talk. CB codes and trucker talk came into being back in the ’60’s and ’70’s, when the CB radio was popular.